TLABC goes to Prince George!

 

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TLABC President, Sonny Parhar and Membership Director, Karen St.Aubin flew to Prince George Tuesday, October 30 to reach out to Prince George lawyers.

They met long-standing TLABC Sustaining Member Dick Byl at his office for an informative conversation. They visited the local Elizabeth Fry Society where they learned about legal issues specific to the community. Finally, they hosted a focus group/dinner meeting with 11 local lawyers, including a few members. This focus group discussion allowed for a strong learning opportunity both ways.

It provided the chance to inform the attendees about TLABC, its issues, membership reach and benefits, programming, to name a few areas, and allowed TLABC to better learn about issues specific to BC North.

“It was a great experience to meet our members in their community and better inform yet-to-be members about TLABC.” – Karen St.Aubin

Ambassadors from TLABC may be hitting your community soon too! Stay tuned for more info…

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Future Leaders – Feature Member, Lindsay Frame

Meet Lindsay Frame! 

Lindsay is one of our law student members who has been stepping up in helping to engage her peers at UBC, particularly with raising awareness about the many issues that the law profession is currently facing.  Recently, she helped to facilitate a presentation to her classmates by one of our mentor-lawyers, the now-retired, Mr. Larry Kancs, and we can see many more opportunities for her to find her place as a future leader of TLABC.  Lindsay is the daughter of long-time TLABC Governor & Past-president, Steve Frame, and we look forward to seeing how she is able to continue to grow within our association.

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Q & A…

What were some of the main reasons that you have chosen to pursue a legal career?

Both of my parents are practicing lawyers, but in a kind of ironic twist, the person who convinced me to apply for law school was actually my molecular genetics professor, Don Moerman. I was in the process of completing my Bachelor’s degree at UBC in Integrated Sciences, and my chosen integration was Neuroscience & Immunogenetics. I was very engaged with my courses at the time, but my distaste for lab work made me acutely aware that a career in research was probably not in my future. Professor Moerman was the first person who ever explained to me how a science background could be valuable in law. It was a perspective that I had never really considered – so when he set me up to have coffee with a former student of his who had recently started practicing IP law, I think that’s when I first started to see a place for myself within the field. My interest was initially focused towards genetic patent work, but I have since expanded my horizons and am interested in anything that intersects at all with science or medicine – especially areas like intellectual property, personal injury, criminal and medical malpractice law.

Were there mentors, leaders, or others who have inspired you?

My parents have been my biggest mentors. My dad is a personal injury lawyer, and my mom is a prosecutor, and although their practice areas are quite different, what they have in common is that they are both very enthusiastic about their work. Growing up, a lot of my friends’ parents would come home from work exhausted, but most of the time, mine would come home excited to tell us about their day – so that has always pushed me to find work that I genuinely love doing. Having been to court a handful of times, I am certainly starting to understand their excitement, which I think is a good sign. My parents also share the philosophy that lawyers have a duty to do work that helps people in the community, and that philosophy has always pushed me to get involved with organizations like the Law Students’ Legal Advice Program (LSLAP) and the Special Olympics, which have been some of my fondest memories.

Growing up, I was also a competitive athlete, so naturally, my coaches were big inspirations. They pushed me quite hard, with a very “tough-love” attitude. During training, as one of a few girls on a mostly-male team, I was generally held to the same standards as all of my male peers – I was expected to run as fast, jump as high, and do as many push-ups. That was sometimes hard because they were big guys, and I was weaker than a lot of them. But nobody ever “went easy on me” because I was a girl, so I had to work harder. I think that experience made me driven, and it made me expect a lot of myself. It really helped to prepare me for this moment, as a young woman entering a somewhat male-dominated field.

How do you handle the pressure that can often accompany the heavy course load of being a law student?

I have always found the ocean to be very calming, so one of my favourite ways to manage stress is to go for a jog on the seawall on a sunny day. I am a fair-weather runner, though, so throughout the winter I’ll often substitute spin and kickboxing classes. I generally find exercise, as well as cooking, to be very therapeutic.

Additionally, the nice thing about law school is that on any given “bad day” another law student is likely within arm’s reach that has also had a bad day for the same or similar reasons – so, I have found a lot of support in my peers this year, as well as from the many lawyers I have spoken to who can relate with their own 1L experiences.

What do you enjoy most about law school?

One of my favourite experiences has been my involvement in the LSLAP. It has given me a lot of exposure to different areas of law, and I have been lucky enough to pick up a few trials which I will be working on over the summer! I have always wanted to be a litigator, so I feel lucky to have hands-on experience like this so early on in my career. Every lawyer I have dealt with so far has been incredibly supportive, and very forgiving of the inevitable embarrassing moments which happen when I am not entirely sure what I am doing. I had always imagined the courtroom to be an incredibly adversarial environment, but I quickly learned that the opposite seems to be true, at least for law students.

What do you find most challenging
about law school?

Time management was one of the things that I have found to be the hardest about law school. The course load is much heavier and more reading-intensive than what I had become used to in undergrad. There is also a constant flow of networking events, and a number of exciting opportunities (such as LSLAP, or other pro bono initiatives) to do in one’s “spare” time. Juggling my academic, extracurricular and personal commitments was sometimes challenging, and at times I certainly felt that I had over-extended myself. At the same time, though, I know it is a rite of passage and that it builds useful skills for the practice of law.

What advice would you give to those thinking about pursuing law school?

Some of the best advice I got at the beginning of law school was not to narrow my focus to one area of law right away. It seems like the first question that anyone asks a law student is “what kind of law do you want to practice?” My answer to that question is ever-changing because I have gained exposure to more practice areas than I would have imagined existed when I first started 1L. I will admit that in the summer before law school started, I complained incessantly about one particular class being a required course… and that class was actually my favourite this year! So, I would tell people who are thinking of pursuing a career in law to do so with an open mind.

If you weren’t studying to become a lawyer, what career path would you pursue?

Occupational therapy. Prior to coming to law school, I spent a number of years working as an “aide” for people with disabilities, and I found the work to be very enjoyable and very rewarding. I contemplated applying for occupational therapy school at one point, as I hoped to be able to directly support victims of traumatic brain injuries, and help them regain control of their lives. Ideally, in my future career as a lawyer, I hope to be able to do this same thing through advocacy, as well as by being involved with volunteer organizations like the Special Olympics.

Why is being a member of TLABC important
to you?

My dad was very involved with TLABC throughout most of my childhood, so while I was growing up, I learned a lot about the types of advocacy that TLABC engages in. I have always found those endeavours to be things that I felt passionately about, as well. I think that TLABC’s access to justice initiatives are particularly important, because they give a voice to those who might not otherwise be able or willing to self-advocate. What I think is most important about TLABC is that their initiatives are powerful: they bring together some of the best and brightest minds to solve problems, together. I think it is so much more effective than branching out alone, and I am happy to have an opportunity to be a part of it.

Additionally, I think that TLABC provides amazing opportunities to meet litigators and learn about their practice areas. To a law student,
the experience is invaluable, because we get a good amount of exposure to corporate firms, but not as much to the types of small firm litigation that a lot of TLABC members practice.

If you could ask a senior lawyer one question, what would it be?

If I had the opportunity to pick senior lawyers’ brains, I would likely ask them what advice they would give to someone who is brand-new to litigation?, or what mistakes they made on their first trials?

Editorial Note:   Would you like to help Lindsay answer her question?
Email julia@tlabc.org

@tla_bc

Recent Success! #PAC

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The Public Affairs Committee (PAC) is TLABC’s fundraising arm for non-operational expenses, generally in the form of special projects and initiatives. Whereas operational expenses cover day-to-day office needs, PAC funds are in place to ensure TLABC can follow through, when and where needed, with regard to seeking justice and fighting back against threats to the rights of individuals.

We have recently had a success that you should all know about! 

The TLABC Legislative Committee has been fighting for over 5 years for changes to the Class Proceedings Act.  Currently if you start a class action in BC, you only act for BC members of the class and others in Canada can opt in to the BC class.  This means that that once a class action is commenced in BC, counsel will be deemed to be acting for all members of the class in Canada.  There can then be a beauty contest between firms in other jurisdictions for a case, but these changes will put us in the running to start class actions that are of national significance and compete for carriage of them with lawyers in Toronto and elsewhere. 

Big thanks to Past-President, Richard Parsons for leading this charge!

Thank you to all of our dedicated PAC Donors who are committed to justice in BC!

Your Membership Matters

A message from our Membership Director, Karen St Aubin…

Don’t let your membership expire! By now, you will have received a few emails and even an old school paper invoice reminding you to renew your TLABC membership. The membership year runs from July 1-June 30 – so, the clock is ticking! I urge you to renew promptly to prevent an interruption in your member access.

To those who have already renewed your membership, thank you!

If you need help with your renewal, have a question about your membership or TLABC, or if you just want to connect, I’m ready to talk! (karen@tlabc.org)

Community

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Connections. We make connections wherever we go. It’s what people do. We connect with our families, with our colleagues, with our clients, with the person standing next in line at the grocery store (okay, maybe that’s just me – I talk to everyone).  Connections make us, well… more connected.

At the New Lawyers Retreat in Squamish at the end of April, I saw connections happening before my eyes. The Welcome Reception provided new lawyer attendees the chance to connect with their fellow attendees, as well as with senior mentor lawyers and sponsors. These connections led to a lively evening full of conversation and fun, and set a comfortable tone for the following day full of education and networking. Many of the new lawyer retreat attendees have asked to participate on the planning committee for next year. These are the TLABC leaders of the future!

“I enjoyed getting to know everyone there. The talks were excellent and the value for [the] price was amazing.”

 “The sessions… were valuable and provided helpful practice insights. It was also a great opportunity to meet colleagues that we may otherwise not connect with.”

 “I will recommend to my colleagues and will try to come again.”

Retreats provide a great opportunity to make numerous and strong connections. The Women Lawyers Retreat planning committee is hard at work on the fall event, and its popularity is a testament of success. Because of the overwhelming popularity of the retreat, this year TLABC members will get a head start on registration as a Member Benefit. It’s just one more reason to be sure that your membership is up-to-date.

I’m making new connections at outreach events. Visiting members and non-members (or hopefully, future members!) in Nanaimo and Victoria in May gave me a chance to connect with many of you who had previously been names only. As the adage goes, it’s great to put a face to a name! I look forward to continuing my travels around the province to connect with our members to share what’s going on at TLABC and encourage membership growth.

And speaking of membership… as I said, it’s that time of year!

By now, you will have received an email offer to renew your membership. And if you are not a member yet, what are you waiting for? Many of you have already renewed for 2018-19, and we thank you for your diligence! For those of you who have not yet renewed, I urge you to do so as soon as possible to prevent an interruption of your member access. If you need help with your renewal, have a question about your membership or TLABC, or if you just want to connect, I’m only a phone call or email away.

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Women Lawyers Retreat ’18

WOMEN LAWYERS RETREAT – 19-21 OCTOBER 2018 at Nita Lake Lodge
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We are currently accepting applications for bursaries to our annual Women Lawyers Retreat, which will take place over the weekend of 19-21 October 2018 at Nita Lake Lodge in Whistler. We are encouraging all women who think they might be eligible to apply! (Please note: applications will be kept confidential.)
Bursary recipients must be one or more of the following:
·        Newly called to the profession
·        A great part of your practice includes Pro-Bono work
·        Experiencing financial hardship
·        Preference will be given to TLABC members
Bursary includes:
·        Accommodation in a triple occupancy room for Friday & Saturday
·        6 hours of CPD
·        All social events and meals over the weekend
·        $150 spa gift card for the Nita Lake Spa (can be used that weekend or at another date)
Write a brief description of why you think you are eligible to receive a bursary, and email it to erin@tlabc.org by Monday July 9th.

ROAD BC #SayNoToCaps

TLABC proudly supports ROAD BC and we encourage you to do the same – ICBC and the provincial government have recently stated their intention to strip you of your rights by implementing injury caps for drivers, passengers, cyclists and pedestrians who are injured in a collision with an automobile.

We firmly believe that this is not the right approach.

Caps punish victims.
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Road BC has nearly reached 15,000 signatures.
Say no to the Government’s unfair caps on injury claims, sign the petition now at

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R.O.A.D. BC is a coalition of British Columbians who are committed to protecting the rights of anyone who becomes injured on our roads. We are made up of individuals and associations all across British Columbia who believe the best way to reduce accidents and protect victims is through established, inalienable rights – not arbitrary decisions that turn real people into a statistic.

 

Proudly supported by more than 50 community partners including:

3 Peaks Health
Absolute Health Clinic
Actin Physiotherapy and Wellness
Active8 Physio & Massage
AIM Medical Imaging
Alaunius Integrated Medicine
Association for Injured Motorcyclists
Back in Motion
BC Back Clinic
Bear Creek Physio
Better Body Fitness
Bikram Yoga Delta
BrainTrust Canada
Campbell River Head Injury Support Society
Canadian Medi-Pain Centres
Canadian National Institute for the Blind
Clover Hills Rehabilitation
Coast Life Chiropractic
Elite Health and Wellness
Fit Body Rehab
Fraser Valley Reporting
Fraser Valley Soccer League
Get Well Physio
Harvey Gill Real Estate (Remax)
Injury Rehab Clinic
Insight Driving Solutions
Insight Optometry and Occupational Therapy
Karp Health Services
Kelly Mooker Counselling
Kinexions
Kwantlen Rehab

Langley Sports and Rehab
March of Dimes Canada
Med-Rehab Solutions​
Medical Legal Society of British Columbia
Mountainview Health and Wellness Ltd
Nanaimo Brain Injury Society
Nova Health
Oceanview Home Care Services Ltd
Optimal Chiropractic & Massage
Pain BC
People in Pain Network
Prana Physiotherapy
Pro Ride Motorcycle Training
Pure Life Physiotherapy
Revive Rehabilitation
Sahara Rehab Consulting Ltd.
Salius Rehab
Sikh Motorcycle Club
Sikh Riders of Canada
Singh Physiotherapy
Strength Through Motion
Synergy Rehab
Total Care Health
Trial Lawyers Association of British Columbia
The BC Paralegal Association
The Mel Jr. & Marty Zajac Foundation
The Whiplash and Injury Clinic
Vancouver ecoVillage
Vancouver Independent Professionals Society
Wellspring Fibromyalgia Foundation
Working Gear

Caps Punish Victims

Say No To Capping Our Rights!

Being injured can change your life and the lives of those around you. The path to recovery is often long, difficult and expensive. Currently, in BC, everyone, and every incident is treated and assessed uniquely.

However, ICBC and the provincial government want to change that and restrict the rights of drivers, passengers, cyclists and pedestrians in BC by introducing injury caps. This will reduce our ability to be treated as individuals, and to seek out help when navigating the daunting process of an injury claim.

Stand with us to ensure our rights don’t get capped.

Contact your MLA

R.O.A.D. BC is a coalition of British Columbians who are committed to protecting the rights of anyone who becomes injured on our roads. We are made up of individuals and associations all across British Columbia who believe the best way to reduce accidents and protect victims is through established, inalienable rights – not arbitrary decisions that turn real people into a statistic.

Visit the site for more information and join on Facebook & Twitter!

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